Motto in Old Norse

According to a definition, motto is a short expression of a guiding principle. Mottos in ancient languages have always been popular, since they express such principles with authority and wisdom of the ancients. User friendly interface below helps to create online mottoes in Old Norse, the language of the Vikings. Catchy phrases that can be created using this tool may be also interpreted as Viking slogans or even battle cries. Such a motto would adorn a weapon as an inscription or shock enemies when shouted during a reenactment of a Viking battle.

1. (noun) and (noun) E.g.: blood and death

  and  





2. (noun) is (noun) to (noun) E.g.: man is wolf to man

  is    to  





3. from (noun), (noun) E.g.: from suffering , wisdom

from    ,  





4. (noun) (verb) E.g.: time flies







5. (noun) is in (noun) E.g.: gladness is in battle

  is in  





Based on the Latin motto generator, with the author’s kind permission.

Waiver of Liability

Keep in mind that computer generated texts should be used with caution for any permanent use like tattoos or engravings. This tool is provided “as is”, without warranty of any kind.

{ 82 comments… read them below or add one }

Chris

I was just wondering if anyone would be willing to help me find a translation of the phrase,
“to he who purges fear and plants truth, lies a seat in the halls of valhalla”
or knows a good Norse phrase or motto involving truth and courage.

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Matthew

Chris, may I ask what the origin of this phrase is? I haven’t been able to find any reference to it on the Internet. As for its translation, I would suggest using Icelandic, or, transliterating the expression into Nordic Runes – either the Elder Futhark or the Futhorc.

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Andy

Hey, I was just wondering if anybody could help me translate “First in, Last out” into Old Norse? I’ve tried looking for the individual words as I can’t find phrases, but I can’t seem to find “in” or “out”. This is one of my favourite mottoes, and I would love to have it in Old Norse as part of a larger tattoo on my arm. Thanks in advance for the help :)

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Jón Arnar

“First in, Last out” in Icelandic is “Fyrstur inn, síðastur út”
In = inn, Out = út.

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Sunnshyne

Do you have a bind rune generator? I would like to find a way to creatively do my magickal name in a bind rune.

Thanks very much for this site. It’s awesome!

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Scott Erickson

OK, how do I translate: go with the flow? That is the mantra of the day I was born upon, which I feel really applies to my life.

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Scott Erickson

Oh, and also, perhaps you might know something about this:

I am really into the Mayan 260 day Lunar calendar (similar to the Aztec calendar). Jose Arguelles, who wrote a recent bunch of books on the topic, talked about indigenous cultures all over the world having their own Lunar calendar. Among them, he mentioned the Swedes, saying they had their own 13 day, 20 cycle (260 day) Lunar calendar. I have never been able to locate this? I would like one on my wall, since I follow the Lunar calendar, I would rather have one that related to my own heritage. Please let me know anything you may know about this! Anyone! Thank you!

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Tor-Erik

Koffer skriver alle på engelsk her?
ingen nordmenn her inne?

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Ola

@Tor Erik

Klart här finns ;)

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Leirf

Og svensker tydeligvis. :P

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Matthew

af ást er kvöl

From love, suffering. :D

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chris

been trying to translate live free or die in battle , into old norse aswell , could any translate please ! cheers

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Nicholson

Cant find anywhere online to accurately translate english to old nordic! Anybody got advice?

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Scott Summerlin

I’m trying to find out if my last name is actually Norse like I was told. I was told it meant” fair weathered sailor”, Summerlini was the spelling I received. Is this true do you know,and is that it’s meaning?

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